Laurie’s Adventures blog

A moose makes BIG TRACKS

030715 deer tracks
Deer tracks for comparison
030715 moose tracks
Are these moose tracks?
030715 moose track with snowshoe
Same size as my snowshoe!

The warmer weather (upper 20’s) and sunny skies made for sparkling snow and early morning shadows to highlight tracks in the woods out back.  I was out several times this weekend for 1 to 1 1/2 hours each, getting in some cardiac endurance training.  These photos from Saturday morning show what I think are moose tracks.  We do not often see moose here in Lincoln County.  In fact, in the twelve years we have lived here, our family members have only seen one or two or three “local” moose, depending on the individual.  In contrast, 20 is our record for a short Allagash paddling trip of less than a week!  This afternoon I said goodbye to the snowy beauty for a week, as I am off to Virginia to visit Megan.  And take advantage of her graphic design skills to spruce up this blog, I hope.

A roof over my head (my new tent)

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Fond memories of the old tent…
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…waiting to make some with the new one

Strategic planning.  Right up there with faith and courage, good decisions up front will help me go the distance this summer.  And strategic planning is ideal for a long, cold, snowy Maine winter anyway.  One goal has been to reduce the weight, volume, and sheer number of items in my gear.  Even eliminating a tiny unused item reduces the number of things to scramble through in the search for whatever I am looking for (usually found at the very bottom of the dry bag).  Today’s focus: Tent, fly, and footprint (another term for a groundcloth)

  • Old: Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight, purchased in 2000 for a backcountry camping trip with my 7-year-old son in Shenandoah National Park (weight 5 lbs., 6 oz. including footprint.; packed size 6″ x 18″; peak height 43″, 2 poles)
  • New: Sierra Designs Flashlight 1 UL…yes, it’s the same model, updated and in the one-person version (weight 2 lbs., 15 oz. without a groundcloth; packed size 5″ x 13″ without poles; peak height 46″, 3 poles)
  • Major changes: Lighter (good), smaller stuff sack (good), poles too long for stuff sack (bad), attached fly (good), side entrance (good), plastic sheet replacing footprint (untested)
  • Cost: $178 from REI with member’s discount and free shipping (Christmas present anyway…thanks, Dad!)
  • To do list: Seam sealing is recommended, cut plastic sheet for inside tent rather than having a footprint, figure out where to pack poles

One winter evening, we had fun setting up my new tent in our living room, staked out to furniture and some metal weights Dad had in his workshop.  I crawled inside and was delighted that it felt roomy and there was plenty of space in its long length to put my gear bags.  I like to bring as much as possible inside my tent at night to keep it dry and clean (everything but food, cooking gear, and boat stuff).  The side entrance makes for easier access and creates a small vestibule similar in size to my old tent’s.  For future backpacking, trekking poles can be used in place of 2 of the tent’s 3 poles.  Lastly, the color works for me.  I was afraid it would be too bright, as I like to blend in with my surroundings.  My little tent will be the color of bright green baby leaves or grass…she sighs wistfully, thinking that is has been months since she has seen any green grass…

Spring awaits…

Winter world waiting for more snow tonight
Winter world waiting for more snow tonight

I promised myself and I try to keep my promises. I would start my new blog at the beginning of March and not a moment later. So here it is, a blank journal to fill with my thoughts and adventures, a chance to share my life with you.

If you have been a recipient of this epic winter deluge of snow and frigid air, perhaps you share my joy at finding myself on the doorstep of March.  Spring and longer days are assured and such wistful dreams as green grass, new leaves and gently lapping waters are drawing closer.  Late this afternoon I crunched my way over the crisscrossing snowshoe trails in the woods behind my house.  They are my winter creation and my tether to the outdoors in this bitter cold.  As the light dimmed homeward, the calming rustle of beech leaves gave way to the heart thump of an owl’s sudden flight from above.

March also brings me ever closer to my summer journey, a solo through-paddle of the Northern Forest Canoe Trail.  This 740-mile trail winds its way from Old Forge, NY to Fort Kent, ME, following historic paddling routes through waters large and small, still and turbulent, all connected by good old-fashioned portages. The half in Maine I have paddled before (except for seven elusive miles) and half I have never seen. Trip planning is gaining momentum, as I shop for a boat, test new recipes, upgrade equipment, and try to picture the NY, VT, Quebec, and NH portions of the NFCT.  Much more on all that later!